How To Correctly Repair A Pitch Mark

Many golfers do not take the time to do the simple task of repairing pitch marks, to the detriment of the course.

Repairing a ball mark makes a huge difference when you are looking at the presentation of a course and who knows, it could be you that ends up having to putt over an indentation in the surface.

However, getting the technique right is more important than you may think. By pushing the bottom of the divot upwards, you can end up tearing the roots, which kills the grass.

Instead, take your ball mark repair tool and insert the prongs into the turf at the edge of the depression. Then push the edge of the tool towards the centre in a gentle twisting motion.

By inserting the prongs vertically and twisting them, you’ll actually introduce air directly downwards into the soil, which helps the roots grow stronger, rather than damaging them by using the tool as a lever to push the bottom of the mark back upwards.

Ball mark repairing makes a real difference to the quality of course greens, both in the health of the turf and the consistency of the playing surface, all of which leads to a more enjoyable playing experience.

So remember:

Right – use the prongs to push grass at the edge of the depression toward the centre

Wrong – use the prongs as levers to push up the bottom of the depression

Repairing Pitch Mark

To view a video on this subject go to: http://www.golfshake.com/improve/view/11279/How_to_correctly_repair_a_pitchmark.html

The video was filmed in association with Golfshake and BIGGA (The British and International Golf Greenkeeping Association) at the Belfry in March 2017.

For more videos in this series covering key aspects of golf courses relevant to golfers, including: correctly repairing pitch marks, how to rake bunkers and aeration, visit: www.golfshake.com/improve/tag/BIGGA/.

BIGGA represents the Nation’s greenkeepers and works hard through education and training to raise standards in golf course management throughout the green keeping profession. To find out more about the work BIGGA do visit www.bigga.org.uk.

Republished with grateful thanks to Golfshake June 13, 2017.