The Do’s and Don’ts of a Corporate Golf Day

 

Each year many of us are fortunate enough to be invited along to a corporate golf day or two. If you’re lucky you’ll be hosted by a company at a prestigious venue where you’ll be plied with free gifts, food and drinks for the duration of the day. Who would turn that down?!

But…..and here’s the problem, people don’t want to turn it down. Even if they’re not a regular golfer, even if their clubs have been in the back of the garage gathering cobwebs, or the only balls they have are some ultra soft balatas from 1991.

We understand the opportunity is too good to turn down. So if you are in the minority and really want to attend but have a backswing like a rusty gate here’s some tips that’ll help you survive and thrive on the day:-

DO

Get a lesson 

No one’s a perfect golfer, but you are definitely not. Even when you watch golfers on the TV and think it’s easy – it’s not. You’re going to be nervous. People will be watching you on the first tee sizing up the competition. Your playing partners are going to be annoyed if you’re hacking it up every fairway. So get yourself a lesson – tell the pro you want some quick fixes so you hit the ball somewhere near straight and go to the day with at least some sense of confidence and reassurance.

Play your game down

Take the pressure off yourself. Tell your playing partners you don’t know where the ball is going to go you’re that much out of practice. If it’s true then hey, sometimes that happens if not, then you’ve lured them into a false sense of security and they’ll be too busy annoyed and muttering ‘bandit’ under their breath to be able to post a decent score themselves.

Respect the course!

Corporate days are rarely played at your local municipal course. This is some high end venue. So don’t go taking divots the size of a football pitch! Keep your head, respect the course and swing it easy.

DON’T

Use the free balls they gave you

Schoolboy error. Not only are other people going to use them which results in an inevitable case of mistaken ball, they’re actually going to be some high end premium balls. So don’t tee one of them up on the first. At least wait 6 or 7 holes until you have found some sense of rhythm and timing. Otherwise you’ll be ruing the lost Titleist’s and reverting to something older, harder and muddier.

Lie about your handicap!

If you do you’re going to end up too high or too low and nothing in between. If you don’t have an official handicap then play a couple of rounds before the day itself, mark a card and average out the scores to find an indicative handicap. Don’t go off the last handicap you had 8 years ago; if you’re out of practice you’ll likely not get anywhere close to it (even if it was 36!)

Trash talk your opponents (too much)!

Trash talk has it’s place, especially at a corporate day. But you need to earn the right to trash talk through some decent golf. Don’t be giving it all that on the first tee because next minute you’ll be in the woods after your third shank with your head in your hands. Take it easy, hold your ground if it’s dished out to you (and if you return the favour), do it because you deserve to. It’ll feel better.

Republished with grateful thanks from an article by:

 

 

Book Your Golf Adventure In Wales This Year

Of course, we would love to give you a warm Welsh welcome at our Glamorganshire Golf Club this summer, the Birthplace of the Stableford scoring system, and one of the oldest golf clubs in Wales.

But why stop there?

2016 is officially the Year of Adventure here in Wales. So you’ve got five more months to book your trip to our famous Welsh courses that play brilliantly all year round.

Have a look at this recent email from Visit Wales:

http://visitwales-news.com/GC7-4DDM3-68KXWTNY3A/cr.aspx.

Croeso i Glwb Golff Sir Morgannwg!

 

 

 

The Sport of Golf is Dying – And You Are More To Blame Than You Think!

How Our Attitudes as Avid Golfers are Disincentivizing People from Sticking with Golf

An article recently came out in the Wall Street Journal discussing the fact that more people than ever tried golf recently according to their study, and yet golf continues to see a decline. Many articles, opinions, and blogs have been written on this subject already. Most of them point to an archaic game that refuses to change it rules to allow access to more people. Still others state that the high cost of playing golf or taking lessons to properly learn the game are prohibitive for a majority. Those points seem to fly in the face of what the article points out – People are willing and able to give golf a try in spite of these reasons.

 In fact, I’ve yet to see someone decide not to play golf because they can’t wear jeans (in fact I see many, MANY people wearing jeans, to the chagrin of some). Actually, I think the reason many people won’t play, is because of YOU, (and occasionally ME TOO.) Why You ask?

Now before you get all offended or defensive (and I can understand why you would), allow me to explain. I am in a pretty unique position, in that I am one of the few who has become proficient in the game very quickly. I have completed almost 3 full years of golf now, and my handicap has been as low as a 4.8. I’ve broken par, and I play from the tips or near it on most courses. This isn’t to gloat, but it puts me in an interesting situation. I feel and see the plights of the novice, the newcomer on the golf course. At the same time, I can certainly say I belong to the avid golfer crowd. I know what it’s like to be annoyed by people playing their 5 hour rounds, or taking 8 practice strokes with their 3 wood when they have no chance of making the green, and likely they’ll be chunking it 30 yards anyway. I also remember very well, BEING that person. As a tournament golfer, I yearn for the competitiveness and pace of playing with really good golfers in my group, whom I’m competing with fiercely. I also recall the complete humiliation and glares from scoring 10s on holes in my first tournament, only a year and a half ago (I am pretty sure I have PTSD from it).

GOLF IS HARD. A lot of people cite that as the reason people don’t stick with it. And from where I stand, it just isn’t true. When people got into it in droves in previous generations, it was just as difficult, and perhaps even MORE difficult with less forgiving clubs and other technology. As a new golfer, the stress of playing poorly was always compounded heavily by the sensation that ‘that foursome’ behind you was breathing down your neck and hitting into you every hole. It was deepened when we’d play with people who wanted to get their round over with and seemed annoyed to be playing with us. I was fortunate to be mentored by a few golfers, one in particular, (shout out to Jimmy Tennant), who had the patience to play with me and see me through the rough patches of early play. I didn’t know the rules, and even if you read the book, the nuances of etiquette are hidden  ‘assumed knowns’ that a new player feels paralyzed with fear about. “Can I stand here? Can I walk here? Do I mark my ball yet?” were all questions that likely all of us faced at some point, and are very intimidating parts of the game, because most people won’t take the time to explain them to you, you are simply expected to know them.

People who look to enter the golf community don’t do it for you. They do it to have fun. And when we, as avid golfers, complain, act rudely and impatiently, and expecting anyone who sets foot on the golf course to know EVERYTHING about golf including the unwritten, we push them away from what we know to be the most beautiful game in the world. We would all benefit from a flourishing, growing game of golf. Green fees paid mean better conditions on more and better courses. Let’s do our part by remembering the novice in all of us, and cutting him some slack. Someone did it for you- whether it was your father, or your friend. In the mean time, a foursome behind you got stuck watching you practice your swing 6 times before duffing it 30 yards. Likely you walked in someone’s line at some point, out of pure ignorance, and yet someone had the patience and directness to just explain you shouldn’t do it, instead of grumpily murmuring and making you feel like you’d ruined their life.

A more inclusive, more inviting, BETTER golf starts with those who tread the course on the regular. It is incumbent upon US to grow the game, not the PGA of America, not Rory, or Ricky, or Jordan. I challenge you to look at your own habits. Not your pace, but your treatment of those around you who are perhaps looking to become the next avid golfer, and ask yourself whether you are doing your part to encourage them to stick around, or whether you are pushing them out. Instead of high horsed behavior, I challenge you to HELP novice players when you see them. Encourage them, explain to them constructively about the little unwritten rules of etiquette. Tell someone to practice their swing and get their distance while someone else in their foursome hits. Tell them to be ready with the line before it’s their shot at putting. We are the true keepers of our game. If the game of golf is to survive, it will be at our hands. If it is not, we may find we only have ourselves to blame.  

Republished with grateful thanks from LinkedIn post by:

L. Oviedo – Owner, Founder, NoteCaddie Mobile Golf on 4.6.2016

NoteCaddie Mobile Golf is an app concept that gives you access to great golf notes. Take advantage of great notes around the course to give yourself consistency and commitment, without taking yourself away from your golf game. Share those notes with the NoteCaddie community, and you can be connected to great notes on a course even if you’ve never played it before, to get that ‘home course’ edge!

Recent Blog Articles:

6 Ways to Convince Your Wife You Should Be on the Course 8/3/15

The Course Manager 9/3/15

Talking Trash 9/21/15

Golf’s New Superman is just Clark Kent 9/29/15

USGA Changes Rules – Hurts Solo Players 11/13/15

Play More Like the Pros, Even If You Can’t Swing Like Them 1.10.16

10 Ways to Beat Your Winter Golf Withdrawals 1/17/16

Make 2016 Your Best Golf Year Ever

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Passing of Finlay Morrison, a True Scottish Gentleman

Finlay Morrison

Right to Left: Finlay Morrison and Alan White, former Chairman of the Scottish PGA

The golf industry, in both Scotland and the rest of the world, recently lost a very fine Scottish gentleman.

Mr. Finlay Morrison served his country with the RAF in the Second World War; he was a stalwart greenskeeper and golf professional at Leuchars, Glamorganshire GC, Elgin, Deeside, Braid Hills and Bruntsfield; he was an accomplished professional golfer who competed in The Open on five occasions and notably finished runner up in the 1956 Welsh Championship; and, in 2009 Finlay was recipient of the inaugural John Panton Lifetime Achievement award to recognize his countless services to the game of golf. To further his list of accomplishments, in the early 1980’s, Finlay also redesigned The Isle of Harris Golf Club, a 9-hole hidden gem links course located in Scarista on the Isle of Harris.

Born in Scalpay, Scotland in 1914, Finlay Morrison reached a personal century (died at age 100) before leaving behind his two children, two grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. He will be sorely missed.

Re-published from Worldwide Golf and Travel September 14, 2015.

This club is famous for: The Stableford scoring system

When he wasn’t happy with his score, this club member invented a whole new points system:
Frank Stableford
Glamorganshire was once the centre of the Industrial Revolution, but all that inventing the modern world pales in comparison to what happened in 1898 at the local golf club when a member decided to invent the scoring system that carries his name today.
“I doubt whether any single man did more to increase the pleasure of the humble club golfer,” said Henry Longhurst.
Dr Frank Barney Gorton Stableford, or ‘Gort’ to his mates, was an excellent golfer, playing off plus one, but he grew frustrated with the bogey system of scoring, whereby the player pitted himself against the bogey (what we now know as the par) for the hole.
In response, Stableford devised the scoring system which carries his name and, as now, the system awarded one point for one over par, two for a par and three for a birdie.
An event was held to try out the system, with Mr W Hastings Watson winning with 42 points and immediately being accused of being a bandit.
Then a little skirmish known as the Boer War happened and Stableford was a called off to serve his country, as surgeon in the Royal Army Medical Corps, and he sort of forgot about the scoring system until thirty years later.
After playing his part in South Africa, Stableford returned to the fairways, first at Royal Porthcawl where he won the Championship in 1907 and then at Wallasey, on the Wirral.
He said: “I was practising on the 2nd fairway at Wallasey one day in the latter part of 1931 when the thought ran through my mind that many players in competitions got very little fun since they tore up their cards after playing only a few holes and I wondered if anything could be done about it.”
The Stableford system was born and suddenly the word “blob” meant your afternoon wasn’t necessarily ruined.
Frank Stableford2
Back at Glamorganshire, the club didn’t rest on its laurels and gained another claim to fame as the spiritual golfing ‘home’ of the famous Barbarians rugby team. This means that some of the best rugby players ever will have enjoyed a booze-fuelled Sunday afternoon on the Glamorganshire fairways.
Baa-Baas
‘You’d think some kind of Easter egg hunt or chase would be better suited for a team of rugby players…’
 
The Baa-Baas, in their famous black and white hoops, would visit Wales each Easter as part of a tour and spent every Easter Sunday between 1901 and 1996 at the Glamorganshire, playing a golf tournament and having a raucous sing-a-long with club members.
Sounds like an absolute hoot.
Republished from National Club Golfer, September 16, 2015.

Junior Ryder Cup News – Day 1 Round-Up Courtesy of Morris News Agency

JUNIOR RYDER CUP NEWS – DAY ONE – FOURBALLS
Junior Ryder Cup - Day 1
 Another first at Glamorganshire, as Team USA complete a white wash on Day one with the scoreboard a sea of Red
EUROPE       USA
      0                 4
As the mist rose on a very Autumnal morning, anticipation was high amongst the gathering crowds to see the Captains’ selection of pairings to battle it out on Day One. Team USA all had their customary Red shirts and all flew the Stars and Stripes flags proudly from their golf bags, a typically brash and intimidating approach from the Americans led by Captain Cam who was excited about the prospect of winning away from home and bringing the trophy back to his Florida mansion on American home soil.
Junior Ryder Cup - Day 1 - USA
In a much more subdued manner, the Europeans turned out in their sky blue with each player wearing a Team Europe pin badge with thoughts of “Seve” and all the European greats that had gone before them. Captain Dan sent his team to the practice area whilst he went around each of the American players to welcome them to this years home venue: The Glamorganshire.
Samuel Ryder would have been so proud to see the impact of his aspirations to bring the two continents together in a respectful way through the power of Golf.
Match One: The opening 4 Ball pairings were juggled around as both Captains were seeking to gain an advantage in the opening match, Captain Cam had put out his favoured pairing of Super Savs and JP, although it hadn’t gone un noticed that USA talisman JP was suffering from some late night exuberations back at his hotel room after the opening ceremony, luckily there was plenty of water on hand to re hydrate the young American party animal.
Captain Dan, in a late move, switched his first pairing to the “in form” Charlie Jones who has proved a bit of a nemesis for JP this season on the USPGA Tour this season and Joe “Mighty” Morris who may not be the longest hitter on tour but his accuracy off the tee and short game should prove to be a good balance to take on the favoured American pairing.
Match Two:
First time European team player, Ralph O`Carroll was partnered with seasoned campaigner Matt George to take on Morgan “the Yank” Crimp and the fiercely competitive Jacob Sweeney. Sweeney with his trademark Umbrella in hand, was prowling around the first tee in anticipation of this mouth watering contest against Europe where he was seeking revenge from last years disappointing results. O`Carroll and George were in relaxed mood chatting to fans and taking in the atmosphere of the Ryder Cup. Some great drives off the shortened first tee and it looked like advantage Europe in match 2 on the first hole although The Yank would have something up his sleeve to silence the home crowd!!
Match 3: The Young Guns of World Golf were on the biggest stage of their golfing careers with both Captains making the decision to blood their young Rookies to get a taste of the event and to settle early nerves.
Some controversy with the Osian being switched from team USA to team Europe at the very last minute, apparently Captain Dan had challenged his residency qualification for USA and discovered a great, great Grandmother from llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch!! Playing partner and younger of the George brothers was delighted with the late switch and commented to the press ” With a name like “Osian” how could he possibly be anything but Welsh, i’m proud to have him as my new playing partner”
The American pairing were clearly unsettled by this late controversy and Ryder Cup first timer Ben looked very nervous indeed, however his partner Freddie who comes from a long tradition of family golfers was able to calm him down and calm his nerves before he smashed his drive straight down the middle of the first fairway – Game on!
Match 4: With so many of the experienced Ryder Cup players absent from the Day one squad, it came down to a straight “shoot out” between the two Captains who agreed to play the first and skip the 2nd/3rd and 4th agreeing halves in order to lead the way in the competition and to make sure they finished early to get back out on the course to support their players.
Having watched all his young team drive down the fairway, Captain Cam was under a little pressure to follow suit. However, the pressure of Captaincy was clearly getting to the American and he pulled out an iron to play safe on the first tee, he then proceeded hit his ball no more than 20 yards off the tee into the heavy rough. Seizing the opportunity, lefty Captain Dan took out the big gun and drove it down to within a short pitch of the green but the American recovered well and put the pressure on the European Captain who misjudged the speed of the green and 3 putted to get away with a half – this would prove costly!
With all games underway, starter for the day and Rules Official “Scotty” retired to the clubhouse to rest his brain after trying to calculate all the 3/4 handicap differences in each match  – and he`s an accountant!!
All matches were fiercely battled out and after the earlier and much publicised “gimme” or “no gimme” in the Solheim Cup, respect for the tradition of the great game was restored with all players making sure there were “no gimmies” all day!!!  
The Americans were too strong on Day one, Captain Dan will need a rethink on his pairings before Day 2 Foursomes, a format which has always traditionally suited the European players. This could be the greatest defeat of all time or do the Europeans have it in them to begin an early comeback?

WATCH OUT FOR THE NEXT PRE- FOURSOMES REPORT FROM MORRIS NEWS AGENCY AT THE (GLAMORGANSHIRE GOLF CLUB JUNIOR) RYDER CUP!