The Craziest Golf Courses In The World

The Craziest Golf Courses In The World

You might think playing the Glamorganshire is tough with a hangover, but some of these courses could get you killed. Very few golfers could pull off par on them.

Nullarbor Links in Australia

Nullarbor Links in Australia

Nullarbor Links is the world’s longest golf course. It stretches across 1,365 kilometres, over 18 different towns and roadhouses along the Eyre Highway in Australia. The par 72 course features water hazards, sand traps, and poisonous snakes to keep an eye out for.

The Lost City Golf Course in South Africa

The Lost City Golf Course in South Africa

Another massive course, the Lost City Golf Course is South Africa covers more than 100 hectares, with almost 7 acres of water hazards. If that’s not tough enough for you, you should probably go in knowing that a lot of those water hazards are infested with alligators.

The Legend Golf and Safari Resort

The Legend Golf and Safari Resort
New Brunswick Tourism / CC BY 2.0 / flic.kr

The Legend Golf Resort in Limpopo, South Africa is more than just a golf course. It’s also a wild game safari with lions, elephants, rhinos, and leopards just walking around the links like it’s no big deal. On top of that (literally), one hole features a tee box 400m above the green on the edge of a cliff.

Falsterbo Golf Club in Sweden

Falsterbo Golf Club in Sweden
John Fischer / CC BY 2.0 / flic.kr

The Falsterbo Golf Club sits at the very end of the Falsterbo peninsula in Sweden. That means that it’s surrounded on three sides by pristine, azure seas. Needless to say, you’ll probably lose a few balls in the drink.

The Himalayan Golf Club in Nepal

The Himalayan Golf Club in Nepal
Daniel Ramirez / CC BY 2.0 / flic.kr
 
John Haslam / CC BY 2.0 / flic.kr

The Himalayan Golf Club features stunning views of the Bijayapur river running through the middle of the course, and the Himalayan mountains all around it. When you’re building golf courses in the middle of Himalayan mountain ranges, you’re bound to be tight on space, so several of the holes actually share greens.

Uummannaq Ice Golf Course in Greenland

Uummannaq Ice Golf Course in Greenland
Stu’s Images / CC BY-SA 2.0 / flic.kr

Uummannaq, Greenland hosts an annual ice golf championship where players need to avoid both icebergs and hypothermia to compete. There is no formal course per se, but they still manage to host the 36 hole tournament (which takes place over 2 days) every year.

Camp Bonifas in The DMZ of North Korea

Camp Bonifas in The DMZ of North Korea
EricAroundTheWorld / CC BY 2.0 / flic.kr

Dubbed “The World’s Most Dangerous Course,” Camp Bonifas is only 400m shy of the Korean Demilitarized Zone. The base features a one-hole course with an Astroturf green. Oh, and minefield. Lots of minefields.

Yas Links in Abu Dhabi

Yas Links in Abu Dhabi
Kirt Edblom / CC BY-SA 2.0 / flic.kr

Yas Island is essentially a giant amusement park for adults in Abu Dhabi. It features an 18 hole course, an indoor Formula One Grand Prix racetrack, a Warner Brothers Amusement park, and a massive water park. At least, it will. The island resort is still being developed, so most of it only exists on blueprints right now.

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Wales Retain “Ryder Cup” Trophy at Glamorganshire Golf Club

wales-win-ryder-cup

The Wales “Ryder Cup” Team with captain Pete Goodfellow holding the trophy

AS MATCHES go this wasn’t a game of two halves but one way traffic from Wales who won the “Ryder Cup” at Glamorganshire Golf Club by 12½ to 5½ last weekend.

The traditional yearly event started with a Texas Scramble on Friday, September 30, which was eventually won by John Peters, Paul Davies, Darryl Hamonda and Richard Jeremy (last year’s Wales’ captain).

In the evening all players representing Wales and the Rest of the World were at the dinner where they received their shirts from both captains, Wales – Pete Goodfellow, and Rest of the World – Richard Kynaston. A thank you here to all the shirt sponsors and to Andy Ferrier for compering the evening with his usual wit and charm.

The betting then took place to see who could predict the correct or nearest scores for the Saturday competition, which was again arranged by Mike Hennessey.

Saturday morning the first teams were on the tee at 8.10am for the foursomes and by lunchtime Wales were leading six points to three with Wayne Blatchford and Ian Jones having a resounding win of six and five.

However Messrs. Brown and Hughes lost four and three, which is down to their antics on Friday night. The afternoon’s matches of fourballs started with both captains playing against each other with their respective partners of Wales’ James Barnett and Rest of the World’s club captain Alan Buchan.

The game was won by Wales on the 18th which set the tone for the afternoon.

Outstanding performances in the afternoon came from Richard Jeremy and Nathan Waters who won eight and six, Steve Morris and Peter Edmunds who won four and three and Tom Maunder and Paul Richards also winning four and three.

Congratulations to Paul Richards for getting the most results correct. Yet again Paul Brown was unsuccessful in getting any points for Wales, so there will be changes next year.

The Wales captain was presented with the Ryder Cup Trophy which was filled with Champagne from the Rest of the World captain.

The two captains’ will again lead their teams next year and have appointed the following vice captains, Wales Richard Hughes and Rest of the World Mike Jones.

A great golfing weekend was had by all and the Club are sure that next year’s event will go from strength to strength.

Book Your Golf Adventure In Wales This Year

Of course, we would love to give you a warm Welsh welcome at our Glamorganshire Golf Club this summer, the Birthplace of the Stableford scoring system, and one of the oldest golf clubs in Wales.

But why stop there?

2016 is officially the Year of Adventure here in Wales. So you’ve got five more months to book your trip to our famous Welsh courses that play brilliantly all year round.

Have a look at this recent email from Visit Wales:

http://visitwales-news.com/GC7-4DDM3-68KXWTNY3A/cr.aspx.

Croeso i Glwb Golff Sir Morgannwg!

 

 

 

The Sport of Golf is Dying – And You Are More To Blame Than You Think!

How Our Attitudes as Avid Golfers are Disincentivizing People from Sticking with Golf

An article recently came out in the Wall Street Journal discussing the fact that more people than ever tried golf recently according to their study, and yet golf continues to see a decline. Many articles, opinions, and blogs have been written on this subject already. Most of them point to an archaic game that refuses to change it rules to allow access to more people. Still others state that the high cost of playing golf or taking lessons to properly learn the game are prohibitive for a majority. Those points seem to fly in the face of what the article points out – People are willing and able to give golf a try in spite of these reasons.

 In fact, I’ve yet to see someone decide not to play golf because they can’t wear jeans (in fact I see many, MANY people wearing jeans, to the chagrin of some). Actually, I think the reason many people won’t play, is because of YOU, (and occasionally ME TOO.) Why You ask?

Now before you get all offended or defensive (and I can understand why you would), allow me to explain. I am in a pretty unique position, in that I am one of the few who has become proficient in the game very quickly. I have completed almost 3 full years of golf now, and my handicap has been as low as a 4.8. I’ve broken par, and I play from the tips or near it on most courses. This isn’t to gloat, but it puts me in an interesting situation. I feel and see the plights of the novice, the newcomer on the golf course. At the same time, I can certainly say I belong to the avid golfer crowd. I know what it’s like to be annoyed by people playing their 5 hour rounds, or taking 8 practice strokes with their 3 wood when they have no chance of making the green, and likely they’ll be chunking it 30 yards anyway. I also remember very well, BEING that person. As a tournament golfer, I yearn for the competitiveness and pace of playing with really good golfers in my group, whom I’m competing with fiercely. I also recall the complete humiliation and glares from scoring 10s on holes in my first tournament, only a year and a half ago (I am pretty sure I have PTSD from it).

GOLF IS HARD. A lot of people cite that as the reason people don’t stick with it. And from where I stand, it just isn’t true. When people got into it in droves in previous generations, it was just as difficult, and perhaps even MORE difficult with less forgiving clubs and other technology. As a new golfer, the stress of playing poorly was always compounded heavily by the sensation that ‘that foursome’ behind you was breathing down your neck and hitting into you every hole. It was deepened when we’d play with people who wanted to get their round over with and seemed annoyed to be playing with us. I was fortunate to be mentored by a few golfers, one in particular, (shout out to Jimmy Tennant), who had the patience to play with me and see me through the rough patches of early play. I didn’t know the rules, and even if you read the book, the nuances of etiquette are hidden  ‘assumed knowns’ that a new player feels paralyzed with fear about. “Can I stand here? Can I walk here? Do I mark my ball yet?” were all questions that likely all of us faced at some point, and are very intimidating parts of the game, because most people won’t take the time to explain them to you, you are simply expected to know them.

People who look to enter the golf community don’t do it for you. They do it to have fun. And when we, as avid golfers, complain, act rudely and impatiently, and expecting anyone who sets foot on the golf course to know EVERYTHING about golf including the unwritten, we push them away from what we know to be the most beautiful game in the world. We would all benefit from a flourishing, growing game of golf. Green fees paid mean better conditions on more and better courses. Let’s do our part by remembering the novice in all of us, and cutting him some slack. Someone did it for you- whether it was your father, or your friend. In the mean time, a foursome behind you got stuck watching you practice your swing 6 times before duffing it 30 yards. Likely you walked in someone’s line at some point, out of pure ignorance, and yet someone had the patience and directness to just explain you shouldn’t do it, instead of grumpily murmuring and making you feel like you’d ruined their life.

A more inclusive, more inviting, BETTER golf starts with those who tread the course on the regular. It is incumbent upon US to grow the game, not the PGA of America, not Rory, or Ricky, or Jordan. I challenge you to look at your own habits. Not your pace, but your treatment of those around you who are perhaps looking to become the next avid golfer, and ask yourself whether you are doing your part to encourage them to stick around, or whether you are pushing them out. Instead of high horsed behavior, I challenge you to HELP novice players when you see them. Encourage them, explain to them constructively about the little unwritten rules of etiquette. Tell someone to practice their swing and get their distance while someone else in their foursome hits. Tell them to be ready with the line before it’s their shot at putting. We are the true keepers of our game. If the game of golf is to survive, it will be at our hands. If it is not, we may find we only have ourselves to blame.  

Republished with grateful thanks from LinkedIn post by:

L. Oviedo – Owner, Founder, NoteCaddie Mobile Golf on 4.6.2016

NoteCaddie Mobile Golf is an app concept that gives you access to great golf notes. Take advantage of great notes around the course to give yourself consistency and commitment, without taking yourself away from your golf game. Share those notes with the NoteCaddie community, and you can be connected to great notes on a course even if you’ve never played it before, to get that ‘home course’ edge!

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Match Captain’s Missive – April 01, 2014

I hope that all who played in Saturdays medal enjoyed the competition, the weather was more like May and the course looked and played superbly considering the time of year.

Congratulations to Paul Rice our winner who was the only competitor able to post a sub 70 nett with his 68, your handicap of 27 will soon be tumbling down based on that performance!

Well done to Jordan Price-Davies for a best gross of 70 ( 71 nett, how fair is that ! ). A word of caution to all regulars in the centurions, the field is already quite full.

We managed to keep times for the round at or below 4 hours during the morning but something happened on the early holes around midday, causing a problem which stretched the times to 4 hours 15 mins then on further to 4 hours 30 mins by the end of the afternoon.

If anyone could shed light on any particular matter which had an impact on times I would be pleased to here from you.

The day was completed in style with the Snakes supper in the evening, how often can we keep saying the next one could never be as good as the last ? But last Saturday will take some beating. ( some members did not vacate the club until 5.00 am if only they could play golf as well as they drink ). Many thanks to Jammy, your 3 years as chief snake will never be forgotten, and three cheers for Hanky our new chief snake.

Roll on the April medal, redemption is only one round away.

Happy golfing

Alan Buchan
Match Captain

Match Captain’s Missive – March 24, 2014

On Saturday we will play the first medal in what I am all sure will be an enjoyable season of golf at the Glamorganshire.

I look forward to seeing many members on the course through the year and hope that when I drive up in a buggy you believe that I am genuinely coming to see if you are having an enjoyable round of golf which is trouble free, not coming to harass you about slow play.

However, now that I have mentioned it, we all know that no one ever plays slowly (or admits to it anyway) and that there is always some plausible reason why a group has fallen two holes behind the group in front.

What I would like to ask of all our members, is that they keep an awareness of what is happening around them on the golf course and appreciate that what they are doing can have an effect on the enjoyment and play of their fellow members.

We should all target to complete a competition round in four hours or better and should ask ourselves as to why, if we have been unable to achieve this target. Without wishing to state the obvious I have listed below a number of measures which could speed up play if you find yourself in the unfortunate position of holding up the course some sunny Saturday this year.

*Be on the 1st tee promptly, to tee off at your allotted time.(up to 5 mins late is a two shot penalty, over 5 mins is disqualification )
* Mark your card when you have left the green.
* Leave your bag/trolley at the point you intend to exit the green.
* Take a provisional ball if you think your ball might not be found.
* Play your next shot before helping a playing partner look for his/her ball.
* Prepare for your your next shot whilst your partners are playing their’s not after.
* Agree with your partners to play when ready if you have fallen behind the group in front.
* Keep your cabin stop to a strict 10 mins

I look forward to receiving your support through the year and can assure you that I will, along with everyone else on the M&H committee do our best to provide you with trouble free, enjoyable competitive golf.

Regards

Alan Buchan
Match Captain